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Slovenia commits to a fully circular economy

The overall goal is to position Slovenia as a European leader in harnessing the power of circularity to decarbonise its economy and transform communities.

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Slovenia is aiming to build a carbon-neutral, prosperous and smart future
Slovenia is aiming to build a carbon-neutral, prosperous and smart future

The Slovenian parliament has passed a motion to adopt an EIT Climate-KIC-led circular economy proposal.

 

A Deep Demonstration of a Circular, Regenerative and Low-Carbon Economy in Slovenia commits the country to becoming a fully circular economy.

 

EIT Climate-KIC, part of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology public-private initiative, has been working in close cooperation with seven Slovenian government ministries, EIT RawMaterials and the European Commission’s Joint Research Council over 18 months.

 

Decarbonising the economy

 

The overall goal is to position Slovenia as a European leader in harnessing the power of circularity to decarbonise its economy and transform communities as well as promote wellbeing and prosperity.

 

“Moving away from traditional linear economic business models and transitioning to closed-loop systems has been defined by the Government of Slovenia as one of the country’s strategic development priorities and an important building block of the carbon-neutral, prosperous and smart future,” said Kirsten Dunlop, CEO EIT Climate-KIC.

 

“Business-as-usual isn’t delivering the pace and scale of change needed. Through this proposal and on-the-ground Deep Demonstration, the country is embracing an unprecedented cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary approach, which seeks to marry different disciplines and work across boundaries, silos and departments.”

 

“Slovenia is embarking on an incredibly bold experiment, connecting ministries and funding to break down siloes, and to capitalise on the benefits of circularity.”

 

EIT Climate-KIC describes it as a great example of a country embracing the benefits and opportunities of radical, structural transformation “for a 1.5-degree world” and added that averting catastrophic global temperature rise will require deep and holistic transformations in every country.

 

A recent report by Material Economics calculated that circular approaches could help to reduce CO2 emissions from materials production in the EU by almost 56 per cent by 2050.

 

Driving circularity

 

Slovenia’s plan centres around driving circularity in five main areas: forestry; built environment; manufacturing; food; and mobility. It will focus on the three pillars of:

  • smart and circular communities
  • circular green development
  • circular policy design and science.

The Slovenian Centre for Smart and Circular Transition will form the physical centre of the entire Deep Demonstration, bringing together the different stakeholders and opening up activities to the wider public.

 

EIT Climate-KIC will help to design a broad portfolio of interventions based on technology, policy, education, entrepreneurship, regulation, social innovation, citizen engagement and financial innovation. It will also connect the Slovenia project to its wider community of innovators and initiatives across Europe.

 

“If we want to achieve climate impact, traditional models of funding and politics need to change," said Dunlop. “In this respect, Slovenia is embarking on an incredibly bold experiment, connecting ministries and funding to break down siloes, and to capitalise on the benefits of circularity."

 

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