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Canadian university installs microgrid for resiliency and research

The microgrids will couple energy supplied by the grid and rooftop solar with lithium-ion battery and DC loads

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The microgrid will help the university undertake research in electric vehicle charging
The microgrid will help the university undertake research in electric vehicle charging

The University of Toronto in Canada is installing a direct current (DC) microgrid system to provide power resiliency, reduce electricity costs, and help to enable research in areas such as electric vehicle (EV) charging at the university.

 

It is being implemented by WorleyParsons, a professional services firm for the energy sector, whose smart and distributed energy team chose Arda Power to supply the microgrid technology.

 

Rooftop solar and battery

 

The microgrid will couple energy supplied by the grid and rooftop solar power with a lithium-ion battery and DC loads. The University of Toronto laboratory will use the microgrid system to develop and test new energy management software for various approaches to EV charging.

 

“This project is the first of its kind in the university research setting and is attributable to the vision of the University of Toronto and the unique microgrid technology provided for the project by ARDA Power,” said Michael Cantin, vice president of operations, WorleyParsons.

“Two areas where we see the greatest potential for these systems to bring disruptive value are electric vehicle charging and indoor agriculture”

The engineering and procurement phases are underway, and the construction phase is set to begin in July 2019, with project completion expected by the end of December 2019.

 

Tristan Jackson, director of smart and distributed energy for WorleyParsons explained the DC approach to microgrids can save significant costs on equipment, installation, interconnection to the grid, and operations. “DC microgrid technology holds great promise for simplifying microgrid design and the related interconnection process, and for improving efficiency by eliminating redundant AC/DC conversions,” he said.

 

“We anticipate many more such projects in the near future,” he said. “Two areas where we see the greatest potential for these systems to bring disruptive value are electric vehicle charging and indoor agriculture.”

 

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