You are viewing 1 of 2 articles without an email address.


All our articles are free to read, but complete your details for free access to full site!

Already a Member?
Login Join us now

Dublin seeks smart solutions to combat lifebuoy theft

Tracking and replacing the life-saving kit costs Irish local authorities an estimated €50,000 a year.

LinkedInTwitterFacebook

Dublin City Council is sounding out the market for solutions to better manage ring buoys.

 

It is seeking more digital, real-time tools to save time and money and boost safety.

 

The council manages around 130 ring buoys in Dublin, located on the banks of the canals and rivers, as well as in the Docklands and beach areas. Up to 15 of these life-saving buoys are tampered with or stolen every week.

 

Each buoy costs €40, so replacing 600 in a year costs Dublin City Council over €20,000.

 

Each buoy costs €40, so replacing 600 in a year costs Dublin City Council over €20,000.

 

As it stands, buoy inspectors must manually check each ring buoy and associated equipment. All problems, including missing parts, are logged on a paper filing system and replacements are deployed on the next visit to that location.

 

IoT tools

 

The council says solutions could include Low-Power Wide Area Network (LPWAN) sensors, alarm systems and associated tools to provide information on damaged or stolen of ring-buoys in real-time. Through the request for information (RFI), the city is also seeking a mobile-responsive map-based platform to be used by water safety officers to identify which ring buoys are missing.

 

Dublin City Council wants to use the RFI to understand the solutions that are currently available before issuing a request for proposals (RFP) in Q1 of 2020.

 

Dublin City Council wants to use the RFI to understand the solutions that are currently available before issuing a request for proposals (RFP) in Q1 of 2020.

 

Dublin’s Water Safety Officer and Water Safety Ireland are jointly responsible for the monitoring and maintenance of the ring buoys in Dublin, so any solution trialled could potentially be scaled across the country. Estimates suggest local authorities in Ireland spend more than €50,000 a year replacing 1,500 lifebuoys that are stolen or vandalised. There are regular reports of the issue in the UK and elsewhere too.

 

A bill has been put forward to make it a specific criminal offence to interfere with lifebuoys or defibrillators. Under the Life Saving Equipment Bill 2017, if passed, anyone convicted could face a maximum prison sentence of up to five years and/or a fine of up to €50,000.

 

You might also like:

LinkedInTwitterFacebook
Add New Comment
You must be a member if you wish to add a comment - why not join for free - it takes just 60 seconds!