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Index finds traffic congestion is on the up

More than half of countries in the latest TomTom Traffic Index have seen congestion increase, with the southern Indian city of Bengaluru ranked the worst.

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Traffic congestion is still proving hard to tackle in many cities
Traffic congestion is still proving hard to tackle in many cities

India has emerged as the most traffic-congested nation in the world, with Bengaluru topping the TomTom Traffic Index and three more of its cities among the top 10 most congested cities globally.

 

According to the index, which details the traffic situation in 416 cities in 57 countries, drivers in the southern Indian city expect to spend an average of 71 per cent extra travel time stuck in traffic.

 

Most congested city

 

Last year’s most congested cities of Mumbai (65 per cent extra time in traffic), Pune (59 per cent) and New Delhi (56 per cent) rank fourth, fifth and eighth respectively.

 

Other cities featured in the top 10 global rankings are Philippine capital, Manila (71 per cent), and Bogota in Colombia (68 per cent) taking up second and third position.

 

Greater Moscow, ranked sixth (59 per cent), takes the lead in Europe with Istanbul (55 per cent) coming a close second. Kyiv (53 per cent), Bucharest (52 per cent) and Saint Petersburg (49 per cent) make up the rest of the top five. Paris (39 per cent), Rome (38 per cent) and London (38 per cent) came in at 14th, 15th and 17th respectively.

 

In the US, the top five most congested cities are Los Angeles (42 per cent), New York (37 per cent), San Francisco (36 per cent), San Jose (33 per cent) and Seattle (31 per cent).

 

In China, Chongqing (41 per cent) was found to be the worst congested city and in Australia, Sydney (33 per cent) was closely followed by Melbourne (30 per cent).

 

“In time, the rise of autonomous vehicles and car-sharing services will help alleviate congestion.”

 

Traffic congestion has increased globally during the last decade, and 239 of the cities included in the new report had increased congestion levels between 2018 and 2019. Only 63 cities show measurable decreases.

 

“Globally, there’s a long road to travel until congestion levels are brought under control. In time, the rise of autonomous vehicles and car-sharing services will help alleviate congestion, but planners and policymakers can’t afford to sit and wait,” said Ralf-Peter Schäfer, VP of traffic information, TomTom.

 

“They need to use all the tools available to them to analyse traffic levels and impacts, so they can make critical infrastructure decisions. And drivers have a role to play too. Small changes in driving behaviours can make a huge difference.”

 

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