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LED used to regenerate historic Shanghai buildings

Signify is helping the Chinese city save 50-70 per cent of annual lighting costs by moving to connected LED lighting.

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The Shanghai Bund features tunable white LED to show buildings in their best light
The Shanghai Bund features tunable white LED to show buildings in their best light

Signify has completed the illumination of the iconic 1930s Shanghai Bund, which includes more than 40 historic buildings, as part of the Chinese city’s effort to regenerate the area and make it more liveable.

 

This complements the project announced last November to give a lighting facelift for the Shanghai Municipality, encompassing three bridges and 77 buildings in the financial and tourist districts.

 

Eco-friendly landmarks

 

Signify is committed to helping Chinese cities develop more eco-friendly business and tourist landmarks by using connected LED lighting to lower energy use and reduce operating costs.

 

The city is expected to save 50-70 per cent of annual lighting costs by moving to connected LED lighting, when compared to areas of Shanghai previously lit with conventional lighting.

 

The Shanghai Bund is part of Signify’s largest ever implementation of connected architectural lighting and it worked with a host of designers on the project. It features tunable white LED façade lighting on 23 out of over 40 buildings that comprise the project to emphasise the architecture’s classical colour tones. Signify’s Interact Landmark system, Colour Kinetics ColourReach and eW reach, Philips UniFlood and Unistrip luminaires are all used in the project.

 

Interact Landmark is being used to monitor and maintain the lighting on the Shanghai Bund building as well as rooftops in the Pudong area and the Yangpu, Nanpu and Xupu bridges.

 

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