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JCDecaux street furniture to boost France's connectivity

The roll-out follows a report by the National Agency of Frequencies that evaluated the impact on network quality and radio wave exposure

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Illustration of a bus shelter with integrated small cell connectivity
Illustration of a bus shelter with integrated small cell connectivity

Outdoor advertising company, JCDecaux, is supporting French telecoms operators to roll out small cells in around 10 French cities in 2019 to boost connectivity.

 

It follows the publication of a report by the National Agency of Frequencies (ANFR) in December 2018 demonstrating the relevance of small cells on street furniture. JCDecaux will draw on expertise gained from a number of pilot projects undertaken with operators in France.

 

Improving mobile coverage and performance

 

The aim is to enable telecoms operators to improve the coverage and performance of their mobile networks for both voice and data traffic in highly populated urban centres. Up to four small cells can be placed on each item of street furniture with a limited visual impact and which offers cities multi-operator deployment solutions.

 

JCDecaux claims to offer aesthetically pleasing, integrated solutions that respect its advertising concession agreements, local urban environmental policies and levels of exposure to radio waves. It said the scalable technology platform used is able to meet today’s connectivity needs and facilitate the services of the future:

  • the density required for the 3G and 4G mobile networks;
  • the availability of an efficient wi-fi network;
  • the expansion of low bandwidth networks required for the development of the Internet of Things (IoT) and related services.

Pilot projects that JCDecaux has been running with mobile operators in France since 2016 were evaluated by ANFR to assess the impact of these solutions on network quality and radio wave exposure on the local population.

"We believe that the deployment of a very advanced infrastructure is a pre-requisite to creating a smart city”

It confirmed that small cells could triple download speeds and gave a positive opinion of the public’s exposure to radio waves, particularly due to their shorter distance to users and the reduction in smartphone power by between two and five times. This limits the exposure to radio waves at the same time as increasing battery life.

 

“JCDecaux is dedicated to helping create cities that are increasingly open, accessible and attractive, and we believe that the deployment of a very advanced infrastructure is a pre-requisite to creating a smart city,” said Jean-Charles Decaux, chairman of the executive board and co-chief executive officer of JCDecaux. “This could well be the source of new products and services that benefit everyone and which create value, growth and jobs."

 

In 2015, the group created JCDecaux Link, a division dedicated to developing connectivity, which now operates in 10 countries (Germany, Brazil, Chile, Spain, France, Italy, Mongolia, Panama, the Netherlands and the USA), working for major groups such as Vodafone, Verizon, Orange, Telefónica and América Móvil.

 

One of its first collaborations in this field was the installation of 200 small cells on bus shelters in Amsterdam for Vodafone in 2014.

 

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