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Tesla launches Megapack for the electrical grid

Megapack achieves a 60 per cent increase in energy density to achieve significant cost- and-time savings compared to other battery systems and traditional fossil fuel power plants.

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Tesla claims it can deploy an emissions-free 250 MW, 1 GWh power plant in less than three months
Tesla claims it can deploy an emissions-free 250 MW, 1 GWh power plant in less than three months

Tesla has introduced a new battery storage product specifically aimed at utility-scale projects.

 

According to the automotive and energy company, Megapack significantly reduces the complexity of large-scale battery storage and provides an easy installation and connection process.

 

Fully assembled

 

Each Megapack comes from the factory fully assembled with up to 3 megawatt hours (MWhs) of storage and 1.5 MW of inverter capacity, building on its existing Powerpack’s engineering with an AC interface.

 

This achieves a 60 per cent increase in energy density to achieve significant cost- and time-savings compared to other battery systems and traditional fossil fuel power plants.

 

Using Megapack, Tesla claims it can deploy an emissions-free 250 MW, 1 GWh power plant in less than three months on a three-acre footprint – four times faster than a traditional fossil fuel power plant of that size.

For utility-size installations like the upcoming Moss Landing project in California with Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Megapack will act as a sustainable alternative to natural gas “peaker” power plants, said Tesla.

Megapack can also be DC-connected directly to solar, creating seamless renewable energy plants.

 

For utility-size installations like the upcoming Moss Landing project in California with Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Megapack will act as a sustainable alternative to natural gas “peaker” power plants, said Tesla.

 

Peaker power plants fire up whenever the local utility grid can’t provide enough power to meet peak demand. They, reportedly, cost millions of dollars per day to operate and are some of the least efficient and dirtiest plants on the grid.

 

Instead, a Megapack installation can use stored excess solar or wind energy to support the grid’s peak loads.

 

Tesla developed its own software in-house to monitor, control and monetise Megapack installations.

 

All Megapacks connect to Powerhub, a monitoring and control platform for large-scale utility projects and microgrids, and can also integrate with Autobidder, Tesla’s machine-learning platform for automated energy trading.

 

Tesla customers have already used Autobidder to dispatch more than 100 GWh of energy in global electricity markets. And, just as Tesla vehicles benefit from continued software updates over time, Megapack continues to improve through a combination of over-the-air and server-based software updates.

 

As the world’s transition to sustainable energy continues to accelerate, the market for advanced battery storage solutions is growing rapidly, notes Tesla.

 

In the past year alone, it claims to have installed more than 1 GWh of global storage capacity with its current storage products bringing its total global footprint to more than 2 GWh of cumulative storage.

 

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