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Better public-private collaboration key to urban mobility

Jaanaki Momaya, UK General Manager of Lime, calls for collaboration between different forms of mobility to create transport that works effectively for all. 

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Over half of the world’s population live in an urban area, and that figure is set to rise to 68 per cent over the coming decades.

 

With an increase in urban population comes an increase in the number of cars, and with an increase in cars, typically comes congestion and pollution. There are over 1.2 billion cars on the planet which emit 22 per cent of all global CO2 emissions.

 

Finding a solution to these challenges is becoming a priority for decision-makers across the world as people demand a better quality of urban living.

 

In response to the growing demand, the past few years have seen a flourishing of urban mobility offerings which offer greener, more convenient ways to travel and represent part of the solution to the transport or mobility challenges cities face.

 

The rise of the sharing economy, involving the concept of sharing goods, services and property, and encouraging people to own less and share more, has been integral to the growing success of shared mobility alternatives.

 

Due to the rise of the sharing economy, consumers are more amenable than ever to the premise of sharing resources, from sharing and renting homes, using tools with neighbours via apps or sharing coworking spaces.

 

Due to the rise of the sharing economy, consumers are more amenable than ever to the premise of sharing resources.

 

This has also been brought into urban mobility solutions too, with options including ridesharing, carpooling and shared vehicles such as bikes and scooters being used by consumers to meet their needs.

 

Shared mobility solutions that consist of light transport vehicles are proving particularly effective for bridging the gaps between existing public and private transport options, helping to get people out of cars to cut transport emissions.

 

Such shared vehicles and e-vehicles are helping to reduce the dependence on private car use, taxis and minicabs, by providing people with the opportunity to use emission-free, convenient and affordable transport methods to complete the first and last miles of their journeys.

 

These light, shared urban mobility solutions also allow people to maintain a healthier fitness level.

 

The thriving of shared mobility solutions has been enabled by the digital economy, whereby companies utilise data to develop efficient services and products better tailored to their customers.

 

Technology’s ability to allow consumers to receive goods and services at speed via apps or online means companies are competing to provide quick, on-demand services that appeal to customers seeking convenience and speed above all.

 

Urban mobility brands serving up convenient, quick and affordable travel options are therefore more in demand than ever before.

 

Urban optimists

 

With the proliferation of new mobility options and the growing awareness of challenges including pollution, congestion, sustainability and lack of space beginning to dominate public consciousness, the ‘urban optimist’ movement is gaining ground.

 

Consumers are increasingly considering their personal impact on the urban space they call home and looking for ways they can offset their environmental footprint.

 

Consumers are increasingly considering their personal impact on the urban space they call home and looking for ways they can offset their environmental footprint.

 

People are reducing their private car use, campaigning for improved cycling and pedestrian infrastructure in cities, and calling for the use of light, electric vehicles such as dockless bikes and scooters which provide carbon-neutral transport alternatives. These mobility solutions also serve to empower people to rediscover the joys of urban life, opening up opportunities to move around the city in more enjoyable and efficient ways.

 

With global warming a growing threat to life on earth, it is clear that fossil fuel consumption must be curbed, and a reduction in the number of private cars is needed, as well as a shift towards vehicles powered by greener energy.

 

In addition, a key requirement for the future of cities will be the implementation of efficient and sustainable mobility options that meet the needs of residents.

 

Collaboration

 

Consequently, urban mobility companies must collaborate closely with policymakers, decision makers and industry leaders to integrate these new mobility options into existing transport infrastructures.

 

Since most users of light, shared urban mobility solutions use them in combination with public transport, providing first- and last-mile solutions will be vital to the future of cities to create comprehensive transport networks.

 

Consequently, collaboration between different forms of mobility will be fundamental for creating transport that works effectively for all. Furthermore, these carbon-neutral alternative options can assist with easing public transport that is outdated or struggling with issues of over-capacity, helping to create seamless transport systems across urban spaces.

 

The future of cities will continue to be shaped by technology, as well as environmental pressures and growing urban populations.

 

Urban mobility solutions are being rapidly adopted across the globe, indicating a strong appetite for a future of transport that is clean and efficient.

 

Cities must embrace innovative mobility solutions and consider how they can better work alongside companies.

 

Cities must embrace innovative mobility solutions and consider how they can better work alongside companies to create spaces that are clean, safe and sustainable, and in which residents can travel without congestion or pollution.

 

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