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Major US cities partner for micro-mobility pilot

Charlotte, Detroit and Omaha are using the Passport mobility platform to better manage scooter deployments and their kerbsides.

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The platform provides greater visibility and control over scooter deployments
The platform provides greater visibility and control over scooter deployments

US cities Charlotte, Detroit and Omaha have embarked on a collaborative programme to manage micro-mobility through the sharing of best practices.

 

By leveraging Passport’s mobility platform, it is hoped that the scooter-share pilots across the three cities will help create a framework for future micro-mobility programmes.

 

The challenge of supply and usage

 

According to Passport, the rapid introduction of micro-mobility has created new challenges for cities to manage the supply and use of vehicles like scooters.

 

Responding to this shift in urban mobility, cities are looking for innovative approaches to embrace the adoption of scooters and drive positive outcomes such as reducing congestion, providing first mile/last mile solutions, improving pedestrian safety and increasing mobility options in underserved areas, the company said.

 

These three cities aim to be the first to apply parking principles, data analysis, and a software platform to charge for scooter parking in order to balance the supply, demand and distribution of scooters.

 

Instead of capping scooter volumes or imposing flat fees, Passport said this methodology and technology allows each city to incentivise behaviour by charging for kerb space fairly across all modes of mobility. Just as cities charge cars to park at the kerb, they can apply an existing digital parking infrastructure for scooters.

“We are now connected to a network of cities facing the same challenges and we can effectively work together to develop a new regulatory model that can be scaled nationally”

“Working with Passport, we can now gather insight on how our citizens are using these new forms of mobility and be more strategic about managing scooters using supply/demand economics,” said Mark de la Vergne, chief of mobility innovation for the city of Detroit.

 

“With this pilot programme, we are now connected to a network of cities facing the same challenges and we can effectively work together to develop a new regulatory model that can be scaled nationally.”

 

With this software platform, the cities can maintain visibility and control over scooter deployments and better manage their kerbs, while enabling mobility providers like Bird, Lime, Spin and Razor to more flexibly and conveniently manage their fleets.

 

The platform will leverage data from micro-mobility providers and allow cities to:

  • Analyse scooter distribution and usage patterns
  • Power kerbside pricing and payments
  • Manage scooters to address city-level objectives like equitable access and first/last mile solutions for transit.

“Our goal at Lime is to provide communities with sustainable, innovative transportation options that help improve access to mobility while reducing congestion,” added Evan Costagliola, director of transportation partnerships at Lime.

 

“Through this partnership, we’re excited to work collaboratively with Passport, Charlotte, Detroit and Omaha to establish a mutually-beneficial, tailored system that introduces the right number of scooters at the right locations to best serve residents and visitors.”

 

Passport said Charlotte, Detroit and Omaha are already part of its existing base of nearly 600 partnerships with municipalities, universities, and private operators worldwide. It has invested $5m to help cities build the digital infrastructure necessary to coordinate “complex urban transportation ecosystems”.

 

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The software will analyse scooter distribution and usage patterns
The software will analyse scooter distribution and usage patterns
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