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People-centric mobility is key to quality of life in cities

Failure to recognise this means an “overly congested state of mobility will deteriorate”, with major consequences for livability and viability of cities, warns a report.

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MaaS and micro-mobility options can help to rejuvenate a city's transport offerings
MaaS and micro-mobility options can help to rejuvenate a city's transport offerings

Improving the future quality of life for citizens around the world hinges on people-centric mobility, a new report finds.

 

Future Mobility is People-Centric, released by global design and consultancy for natural and built assets, Arcadis, advises decision-makers in the field of urban mobility to focus investments on end users’ benefit. If they fail to do so, their “overly congested state of mobility will deteriorate”, with major consequences for livability and viability of cities, the report warns.

 

Mobility through three lenses

 

The report examines people-centric mobility through three lenses: connected, sustainable and optimised mobility.

 

According to Arcadis, smart investment in core mobility (rail) combined with the adaptation and integration of the right new technologies (data analysis, mobility-as-a-service [MaaS]) and micro-mobility solutions, can rejuvenate any city’s transportation offerings. It will provide tailor-made journeys for public transit users.

 

Cities investing in a people-centric combination of optimised mobility, connectivity and sustainability will have a competitive advantage. The first and last mile, which describes the movement of people from home to a transportation hub, from the hub to a destination and back again, is a crucial component of a commuter’s journey

 

Optimised mobility aims to elevate the value of the full asset ecosystem in a city to its highest level, which requires an understanding of three things:

  • citizen wants and needs;
  • existing infrastructure;
  • data knowledge.

With the development of new technologies and smart use of data, it is possible to connect people, places and goods across all transport modes in cities in a seamless way.

“Cities need to understand what these changes will mean for current infrastructure assets, and how to plan for the future to truly make their mobility more people-centric"

Connected mobility creates a seamless, flexible and integrated experience to benefit travellers based on technology and data management, the report notes. Apps or platforms allow a user to choose the most cost-friendly and efficient mode of travel.

 

The data gathered and shared through such platforms will improve cities’ strategic decision-making and operational performance, while mitigating inequalities.

 

Sustainability is a vital thread that supports future mobility. Many new forms of mobility (connected and autonomous vehicles, motorised bikes) are more sustainable. New modes of low carbon transportation will impact every stage of commuting, but particularly the first and last mile.

 

“People-centric mobility is about the commuter – the person undertaking a journey on a daily basis. We want to make that experience more sustainable, more connected and more efficient,” said John Batten, global cities director, Arcadis.

 

“Cities need to understand what these changes will mean for current infrastructure assets, and how to plan for the future to truly make their mobility more people-centric. Their future success and the wellbeing of their citizens largely depends on the investments made now in the field of people-centric mobility.”

 

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