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Smart Cities Council releases free tool to support coronavirus action

The COVID - 19 Mitigation Roadmap includes guidelines for assembling the team, a framework for planning, risks to consider, funding information and more.

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The Smart Cities Council has released the COVID - 19 Mitigation Roadmap planning tool in its Smart Cities Activator platform to help cities act faster on tackling the coronavirus pandemic.

 

The Smart Cities Activator platform helps cities understand their needs, assets and stakeholders, and to visualise and centralise planning. Previously, it has been used by cities to manage projects such as smart streetlights, smart parking, climate mitigation, public safety and device and asset management.

 

The COVID - 19 Mitigation Roadmap in Smart Cities Activator, which is available free for cities, includes guidelines for assembling the team, a framework for planning, risks to plan for (including protecting the homeless, first responders and cyber assets), useful tools, funding information and more.

 

Breaking down silos

 

Philip Bane, CEO, Smart Cities Council, stresses the importance of internal and cross-border collaboration, which the COVID - 19 Mitigation Roadmap aims to support.

 

“A big problem for cities is that they can’t convert knowledge to action. To have a smart city, you need to break down the silos. And, if you really want to use technology the way it’s supposed to be used, you’ve got to combine budgets and use cases,” Bane told SmartCitiesWorld.

 

The tool could be used by any stakeholders working to protect communities, from universities to a town, city, province, state or county. It also allows cities to see plans from other municipalities (where they have agreed to share) so they can learn from each other.

 

“This is a marathon, not a sprint. There are a lot of things that are going to happen, probably six months from now, that [we] didn’t count on.”

 

“We’re trying to provide somebody who’s not a public health expert, but has to deal with this, with a thought process or framework, without overloading them,” said Bane.

 

The tool includes guidelines for long-term as well as short-term planning.

 

“This is a marathon, not a sprint,” Bane said. “There are a lot of things that are going to happen, probably six months from now, that [we] didn’t count on.”

 

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