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Remix helps to redesign the streets

Its aim is to enable cities to take a proactive role in managing both public and private transportation

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Remix's mission is to help cities better understand and manage their streets
Remix's mission is to help cities better understand and manage their streets

Technology company Remix, that helps more than 300 cities worldwide improve public transportation, has launched a platform to help cities plan and manage new mobility options such as shared scooters and bike-share. It also enables planners to create and share street design concepts and inform policy for safer, more accessible communities.

 

Visualising and managing data

 

Remix, which is based in Amsterdam and San Francisco, sets out to help cities take a proactive role in managing both public and private transportation, ensuring equitable, safe and accessible outcomes.

 

Its Remix for New Mobility aims to help cities visualise and manage data from scooters, bike-share, and other shared mobility providers and analyse their impact within broader transportation goals. Remix for Streets helps planners prioritise infrastructure investments and design streets for people using all modes.

 

“As a rapidly expanding industry, new mobility options like bikes and scooters present a unique opportunity to reshape transportation, but only if cities can quickly integrate smart policies with new data standards, better technology, and mission-aligned infrastructure,” said Tiffany Chu, Remix COO.

“Cities desperately need technology that integrates the explosion of new mobility options into their overall transportation plan, including infrastructure investments”

The platform includes digital mapping integrated with safety and transportation data such as collision locations, lane geometries, and real-time scooter and bike-share device locations. City planners can create and explore new street design concepts, create geofences where bikes and scooters are restricted or allowed, and publish easy-to-understand plans for feedback.

 

“Cities desperately need technology that integrates the explosion of new mobility options into their overall transportation plan, including infrastructure investments,” said Chu. “We want to provide city planners with the best possible means to achieve community goals."

 

Remix recently surveyed 50+ municipalities with populations ranging from 20,000 to 1.5 million across North America and Europe. Overall, cities are ready to focus on infrastructure investments and proactively manage new mobility providers.

 

The research findings included the following:

  • 85 per cent of cities have incorporated new modes of mobility like bike-share, scooters, electric bikes, dockless bikes, and ride-share like Uber/Lyft
    55 per cent of cities have experienced challenges in adding new modes, including regulating new private providers, communicating partnerships with the public, and successfully integrating these new modes into the existing system
    Only 20 per cent of cities have dedicated funding to tackle these new forms of mobility, but nearly 60 per cent believe that the city or transit agency should play a role in making sure the right mix of modes are in place.

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