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Glasgow acts to counter economic and social impact of flooding to homes

The Scottish city is launching a project designed to better manage rainwater in the Drumchapel area, as well as improve greenspace and protect waterways from pollution.

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Project aims to better manage surface water, especially during extreme weather
Project aims to better manage surface water, especially during extreme weather

Glasgow is launching a project designed to better manage rainwater in the Drumchapel area of the city.

 

The project aims to reduce the negative economic and social impact of flooding to homes, businesses and transport links, as well as improve greenspace and protect waterways from pollution.

 

Partnership project

 

The Glasgow City Region Deal, funded by both the UK and Scottish Governments, and Scottish Water, are the key funders of this project through the Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Partnership.

 

The latter is working with partners to deliver a programme of schemes to "sustainably drain Glasgow", targeting areas across the city where rainfall adversely impacts communities. Its vision is "to transform how the city region thinks about and manages rainfall to end uncontrolled flooding and improve water quality".

 

Working in partnership with Scottish Water, the project design at Drumchapel will work with Garscadden Burn to better manage surface water, especially during extreme weather, as well as using existing space to temporarily store floodwater.

 

By decreasing the likelihood of flooding downstream, the risk and impacts on people’s homes and businesses from heavy rainfall are reduced. In addition, a new drainage basin will be created near Kinfauns Drive to store and treat rainwater before slowly releasing it back into the burn (stream).

 

A programme of schemes aim to "sustainably drain Glasgow", targeting areas across the city where rainfall adversely impacts communities.

 

Carefully selected plants, which will be added to the basin, not only clean the water run-off but will improve the attractiveness and bio-diversity of the area.

 

Project benefits will also include enhanced landscaping, footpath construction, a new pedestrian footbridge, work experience opportunities for young people and the creation of natural play areas.

 

Ahead of the main construction work starting, a number of trees will be felled. This will be compensated for in the coming months with a high-quality landscape design, which is expected to increase the variety of plants and animal life in the area.

 

Both the UK and Scottish Governments are providing the Glasgow City Region local authorities with £500 million each in grant funding.

 

Smart canal project

 

Other MDGSP projects include construction of the North Glasgow Integrated Water Management System – Glasgow’s Smart Canal – which uses the 250-year-old Forth and Clyde Canal and smart technology to reduce flood risk and the impacts of climate change. It will unlock 110 hectares across the north of the city for investment, regeneration and development.

 

The project is now in the formal commissioning and testing phase as it becomes operational and available should a significant storm event impact the north of Glasgow.

 

In December, pupils from Aultmore Park Primary School headed out to Blairtummock Park to mark the completion of the £7.4 million Cardowan Surface Water Management Plan (SWMP).

 

As part of the Greater Easterhouse Green Infrastructure Project, it has created new green spaces and enhanced existing ones by introducing surface water management features that will reduce the risks and impacts of flooding for the local area, and also downstream through the east end of Glasgow, while creating drainage capacity for housing-led regeneration.

 

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