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US mayors approve resiliency resolution

Resolution urges adoption of fault-tolerant technology solutions for data centres and edge computing facilities to protect public and private data.

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Reno knows first-hand the huge growth in data generated by smart city applications
Reno knows first-hand the huge growth in data generated by smart city applications

The US Conference of Mayors (USCM) has unanimously approved a Data Protection at the Edge Resolution, sponsored by mayor Hillary Schieve of Reno, Nevada, calling for sweeping improvements to data security and infrastructure.

 

The measure calls for greater protection against the risks of physical intrusion and infiltration of edge sensors associated with the deployment of smart city technologies. Mayor Schieve collaborated with Nevada-based data centre developer Switch to create the language for the resolution.

 

Bolstering data security

 

The US Conference of Mayor’s resolution encourages the Administration and the US Congress to bolster data security at the edge through deployment of fault-tolerant technology solutions critically necessary for resilience, redundancy, and reliability of data systems.

 

It also calls for protecting public and private data with the highest possible physical infrastructure standards to ensure data centres and edge computing facilities function with the strongest continuity of service and network operations.

 

This measure follows the Data Protection Resolution adopted in 2018 by the country’s mayors to strengthen resiliency and security of data infrastructure at the core.

"As mayors on the front line of technology deployment, we call on the Administration and our Congressional leaders to adopt the highest national standards for the safety and integrity of this data across the nation"

"As the country’s first mayor to oversee the unmanned and autonomous deployment of aerial commercial drones over an urban area in downtown Reno, I know first-hand that the incredible growth of data being generated by the Internet of Things and the continued evolution of smart cities requires the most secure infrastructure possible," said Reno mayor, Hilary Schieve.

 

"As mayors on the front line of technology deployment, we call on the Administration and our Congressional leaders to adopt the highest national standards for the safety and integrity of this data across the nation."

 

Co-sponsoring mayors

 

The 2019 Data Protection at the Edge Resolution was co-sponsored by mayors: Debra March of Henderson, Nevada; John Mirisch of Beverly Hills, California; and Mark Mitchell of Tempe, Arizona.

 

"As our cities continue to embrace the rapid adoption of smart city technology through connected devices, deployment of sensors, autonomous vehicles, smart grids and more, we must ensure the massive growth of data infrastructure is as strong and resilient as possible," said Henderson mayor Debra March.

 

"That is why I co-sponsored this resolution calling for a continued focus on bolstering data security and infrastructure at the national level to better protect Henderson and other cities all across our nation from harm."

 

Earlier this summer, the US Conference of Mayors passed a resolution that calls on cities not to pay the ransom from a cyber-attack. It was sponsored by Jack Young, mayor of Baltimore, whose city suffered a crippling attack in May and which refused to pay around $76,000 in bitcoin to hackers.

 

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